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Your Guide to End of Season Skiing


YOUR GUIDE TO END OF SEASON SKIING

Where to go and what to wear - here's everything you need to know to do spring skiing right this year


The refreshing lack of lift queues makes end of season skiing a huge hit with all skiers and snowboarders, but it’s all too common for those not so familiar with snow seasons to have a concern over ‘risking’ poor conditions on the slopes. If you’re one of those people, fear no more with our top tips. 

Where to go

North America is incredible during the spring months. The weather has warmed up from the minus temperatures that you can experience during peak season and, thanks to heavy snowfall at the beginning of the season, you don’t experience the same ‘patchy’ runs that can cause concern closer to home.

 

As for Europe, you’ll find Solden and Obergurgl in Austria are reliable late season picks. Argentiere in the Chamonix region and Val d’Isere or Tignes are both solid picks in France, all benefiting from either high altitude or glaciers which guarantees snow.

 

If you’re not keen on slush, make the most of early mornings. Get up and out for the first lifts while the snow is still crisp from the overnight chill, then enjoy afternoon après. Not only will you go home feeling like you made the most of your holiday, you’ll have experienced the best snow of the week. 

Five tips when dressing for the sunshine

There’s no denying it, skiing and snowboarding is hard work. And even in the coldest conditions, during the middle of the day, you’re likely to feel comfortably warm. Throw sun and a down jacket into the mix and it won’t be long before you realise that you got it very wrong. So here are our tips for dressing right...

1. ALWAYS WEAR A LIGHTWEIGHT BASE LAYER

Whether you prefer a synthetic fabric, merino wool, or a mix of the two, bear in mind that for a warm day on the slopes, this layers main purpose is to wick away sweat, therefore avoiding a chill later in the day rather than retaining warmth throughout the day. Choose a top and pants on the basis of them being used in mild conditions with a high level of activity involved. 

2. DWR COATED MID-LAYER OR HOODIE/SHELL JACKET

A shell is used to provide a solid outer layer, protecting you from wind and moisture. In a high quality Gore-Tex shell, you’ll find unparalleled breathability. For more freedom of movement on the mountain, a mid-layer or hoodie with a water repellent coating will not only save the pennies but do a stellar job at adding a little warmth for when the sun goes down and prevent the slush from soaking through. 

3. PACK A BUFF

The original Buff’s not only look great but are a useful accessory. For the Spring, try out the High UV Protection Buff. It blocks 95% of UV rays and transports moisture away from your skin to leave you cool. 

4. SUNGLASSES

Goggles work well on the slopes, but you can’t wear them on the lunch terrace. A pair of sunnies will keep you looking cool and reduce the glare from your pint glass.

5. SUNSCREEN

We’ve all seen a skier with a painfully red nose. And it’s no myth that the sun is even more intense in the mountains as it reflects off the snow. So ensure you apply SPF30 or higher at altitude, and stay hydrated. Re-apply regularly and carry a pocket-size tube. 


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